How to Write the Conclusion of an Essay | The Pen …

The function of the essay's Conclusion is to restate the main argument


What is the significance of your findings?
What are the implications of your conclusions for this topic and for the broader field?
Are their any limitations to your approach?
Are there any other factors of relevance that impact upon the topic but fell outside the scope of the essay?
Are their any suggestions you can make in terms of future research?

If the theme is clear and makes sense, the conclusion ought to be very easy to write. Simply begin by restating the theme, then review the facts you cited in the body of the paper in support of your ideas—and it's advisable to rehearse them in some detail—and end with a final reiteration of the theme. Try, however, not to repeat the exact language you used elsewhere in the paper, especially the introduction, or it will look like you haven't explored all aspects of the situation ().


B. How to Write a Conclusion.
In much the same way that the introduction lays out the thesis for the reader, the conclusion of the paper should reiterate the main points—it should never introduce new ideas or things not discussed in the body of the paper!—and bring the argument home. The force with which you express the theme here is especially important, because if you're ever going to convince the reader that your thesis has merit, it will be in the conclusion. In other words, just as lawyers win their cases in the closing argument, this is the point where you'll persuade others to adopt your thesis.

One or more of the following strategies may help you write an effective conclusion

These are not arbitrary requirements. Introductions and conclusions are crucial in persuasive writing. They put the facts to be cited into a coherent structure and give them meaning. Even more important, they make the argument readily accessible to readers and remind them of that purpose from start to end.

12 Essay Conclusion Examples to Help You Finish …

These represent the most serious omission students regularly make. Every essay or paper designed to be persuasive needs a paragraph at the very outset introducing both the subject at hand and the thesis which is being advanced. It also needs a final paragraph summarizing what's been said and driving the author's argument home.

This resource covers writing a detailed conclusion for your GED essay

And it’s important to write a good conclusion

It is important to know that essay readers perform what is known as “holistic” scoring, meaning that they give your essay a score based on their overall impression. The two readers’ scores are averaged to form one score for your essay. If your essay receives an average score of 2 or higher, this score is combined with your score from Part I to make a composite score for the Language Arts, Writing test. If it receives a score below 2, the testers will not assign a composite score. You will have to retake both parts of the Language Arts, Writing test.

There are five major standards that essay readers will use to evaluate your essay. Descriptions of these standards are listed below and are reprinted with permission of the American Council on Education.

How To Write An Essay Conclusion Quickly and Easily

The topic provided—also called the writing prompt—will cover a subject of general interest. Responding to the topic will not require you to have specific knowledge of any subject area, but instead will require you to draw on your own experiences and observations. You will be asked to give an opinion or an explanation of something. A few sample essay topics are listed below.


No matter how much you know, if you can't: write a good essay you will not do well

The lessons included in this resource are based on the five major areas that readers use to score your essay. You might recognize some of the key words and concepts discussed in these lessons from previous classes or reading. Even though the lessons are tailored to the GED essay, the ideas discussed in this resource may relate to writing situations you have encountered in the past or will encounter in the future. Studying these lessons will help you develop your writing skills for use in many situations in addition to the GED essay.

The following table, reprinted with permission of the American Council on Education, will help you further understand how the four-point scale and the five major scoring standards are used together to evaluate the essays.

Your essay lacks only two paragraphs now: the introduction and the conclusion

Think of it this way. As the writer of an essay, you're essentially a lawyer arguing in behalf of a client (your thesis) before a judge (the reader) who will decide the case (agree or disagree with you). So, begin as a lawyer would, by laying out the facts to the judge in the way you think it will help your client best. Like lawyers in court, you should make an "opening statement," in this case, an introduction. Then review the facts of the case in detail just as lawyers question witnesses and submit evidence during a trial. This process of presentation and cross-examination is equivalent to the "body" of your essay. Finally, end with a "closing statement"—that is, the conclusion of your essay—arguing as strongly as possible in favor of your client's case, namely, your theme.

How To Write An Essay | History Today

In the second part of the GED Language Arts, Writing test, you will have 45 minutes to plan, write, and revise an essay. While it is recommended that you use the full 45 minutes for this part of the test, if you finish early, go back to work on the multiple-choice questions from Part I. Provided below is information about the essay topics. This section also explains how your essay will be scored. Lastly, the section discusses what readers are looking for when they score your essay.