An Essay of Dramatic Poesy by John Dryden: An Overview

John Dryden’s An Essay on Dramatic Poesy presents a brief discussion on Neo ..

But if we will allow the Ancients to have contriv'd well, we must acknowledge them to have writ better; questionless we are depriv'd of a great stock of wit in the loss of Menander among the Greek Poets, and of Cæcilius, Affranius and Varius, among the Romans: we may guess of Menanders Excellency by the Plays of Terence, who translated some of his, and yet wanted so much of him that he was call'd C. Cæsar the Half-Menander, and of Varius, by the Testimonies of Horace Martial, and Velleus Paterculus: 'Tis probable that these, could they be recover'd, would decide the controversie; but so long as Aristophanes in the old Comedy, and Plautus in the new are extant; while the Tragedies of Eurypides, Sophocles, and Seneca are to be had, I can never see one of those Plays which are now written, but it encreases my admiration of the Ancients; and yet I must acknowledge further, that to admire them as we ought, we should understand them better than we do. Doubtless many things appear flat to us, whose wit depended upon some custome or story which never came to our knowledge, or perhaps upon some Criticism in their language, which being so long dead, and onely remaining in their Books, 'tis not possible they should make us know it perfectly. To read Macrobius, explaining the propriety and elegancy of many words in Virgil, which I had before pass'd over without consideration, as common things, is enough to assure me that I ought to think the same of Terence; and that in the purity of his style (which Tully so much valued that he ever carried his works about him) there is yet left in him great room for admiration, if I knew but where to place it. In the mean time I must desire you to take notice, that the greatest man of the last age (Ben. Johnson) was willing to give place to them in all things: He was not onely a professed Imitator of Horace, but a learned Plagiary of all the others; you track him every where in their Snow: If Horace, Lucan, Petronius Arbiter, Seneca, and Juvenal, had their own from him, there are few serious thoughts which are new in him; you will pardon me therefore if I presume he lov'd their fashion when he wore their cloaths. But since I have otherwise a great veneration for him, and you, Eugenius, prefer him above all other Poets, I will use no farther argument to you then his example: I will produce Father Ben. to you, dress'd in all the ornaments and colours of the Ancients, you will need no other guide to our Party if you follow him; and whether you consider the bad Plays of our Age, or regard the good ones of the last, both the best and worst of the Modern Poets will equally instruct you to esteem the Ancients.

They are arranged in chronological order." Includes Aristotle's Poetics, Ars Poetica by Horace, The Defence of Poesy by Sir Philip Sidney, An Essay of Dramatic Poesy by John Dryden, An Essay on Criticism by Alexander Pope, The Four Ages of Poetry by Thomas Love Peacock, The Study of Poetry by Matthew Arnold, Tradition and the Individual Talent by T.

Dryden in his Essays of Dramatick Poesy (1668) confidently asserted that “if natural Famous Quotations About William Shakespeare There Shakespeare, on whose forehead climb The crowns o the world; oh, eyes sublime With tears and laughter for all time!

An Essay of Dramatick Poesie By John Dryden Edited by Jack Lynch

Mac Flecknoe: John Dryden - Summary and Critical Analysis Mac Flecknoe is the finest short satirical poem in which Dryden has treated Thomas Sahdwell with humorous A collection of quotes attributed to English poet and dramatist John Dryden.

Of Dramatic Poesie, an Essay | work by Dryden | …

English Literature: An Essay of Dramatick Poesie: Dryden

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Summary of an essay on dramatic poesy by john dryden